THE INVISIBLE MAN: Correcting a Brother | FCC 114

In THE INVISIBLE MAN, Dr. Jack Griffin has been caught in sin. Dr. Cranley and his daughter Flora try to help him. They try to do it without getting unbelievers involved. Join us as we discuss these Christian themes and so much more in this episode of the Finding Christ In Cinema podcast.

For your convenience you will find each podcast segment at the time referenced below:

  • 00:00:00 – Introduction and Previous Episode Recap
  • 00:03:29 – Movie Discussion
  • 00:32:20 – Christian Themes in THE INVISIBLE MAN
  • 01:10:46 – Listener Challenge and Feedback
  • 01:15:58 – Well-mannered Frivolity
  • 01:23:50 – Lightning Round 
  • 01:27:59 – Upcoming

Monocaine and Leaven

Dr. Jack Griffin has been meddling in some things that ought to be left alone. He has somehow activated the power of monocaine, a mysterious drug that absolves the color of anything it touches. When scientists first tested it for bleaching, it destroyed the material. When scientists further tested it on a dog, it turned the dog “dead white” and “sent it raving mad.” Dr. Jack Griffin has binged on this drug so much so that it has made him into the Invisible Man, and it has puffed him up to believe that he is the most powerful man in the world.

This image from THE INVISIBLE MAN shows Claude Rains as the Invisible Man.

The first Biblical parallel we can draw from monocaine is leaven. But not just any leaven, but the leaven of the Pharisees. Anytime Jesus speaks of leaven in a parable, He uses it as a metaphor for pride. Just as leaven puffs up the dough for bread, pride puffs up the spirit of man. That’s why God calls for His people to be like “unleavened bread” – empty and devoid of selfish pride. This is the sin that Jack is caught up in, and he’s too far gone that he can’t get out of it alone.


When the Invisible Man Sins, Go to Him in Private

When Dr. Cranley and Dr. Kemp finally figure out what’s going on with Jack, the two different believers take two different approaches in trying to restore their brother. Dr. Kemp first calls Dr. Cranley over to his house when Jack makes himself at home at Dr. Kemp’s house. But when Dr. Cranley doesn’t take the measures that Dr. Kemp believes he ought to take, the latter goes crawling to the police. This is a picture of how some Christians go against what Christ says when he said, “If a brother sins, go to him in private.” Even Paul admonishes those believers who take disputes between themselves to the center of a secular court. It’s an action that shatters the witness to the world, and Jesus was adamantly against such behavior.

This image from THE INVISIBLE MAN shows Henry Travers and Gloria Stuart.

Dr. Cranley and his daughter Flora, however, take Jesus’s advice and go to Jack in private. They try to reason with Jack without getting unbelievers involved. And it even works for a short while. Jack remembers the love that he has for Flora. Unfortunately, that love is eclipsed by the leaven in Jack’s heart. It isn’t until Jack is on his deathbed that he is fully restored by Flora’s love. It’s a very visible image of how Christians can, over time, affect change by acting in love and obeying Jesus when he says that we should go to a fellow believer in private if they are caught in a sin.


Key Texts

Matthew 16:5-12 NASB

And the disciples came to the other side of the sea, but they had forgotten to bring any bread. And Jesus said to them, “Watch out and beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees.” They began to discuss this among themselves, saying, “He said that because we did not bring any bread.” But Jesus, aware of this, said, “You men of little faith, why do you discuss among yourselves that you have no bread? Do you not yet understand or remember the five loaves of the five thousand, and how many baskets full you picked up? Or the seven loaves of the four thousand, and how many large baskets full you picked up? How is it that you do not understand that I did not speak to you concerning bread? But beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees.” Then they understood that He did not say to beware of the leaven of bread, but of the teaching of the Pharisees and Sadducees.

Galatians 6:1 NLT

Dear brothers and sisters, if another believer is overcome by some sin, you who are godly should gently and humbly help that person back onto the right path. And be careful not to fall into the same temptation yourself.


Finding Christ In Cinema is the show where we discover Christian themes in movies past and present. Join us and together we’ll dig deeper into the silver-screen classics of yesteryear as well as the box-office hits of today. Brought to you by the Great Commission Transmission Network. View the complete show notes – including links to articles discussed – by clicking here.

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Brenden’s Invisible Man Action Figure!

And for that extra Octoberween bonus, here’s the picture of the Invisible Man action figure that I once had but it since…disappeared.

This is an INVISIBLE MAN action figure.


About Brenden Taylor

Brenden is an educational assistant and tutor by day and a theatre practitioner by night. He has his M.A. in Theatre Arts and is always looking for a way to use good stories to soften people’s hearts.

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  • Philip Heard

    Hey guys! Well this was another film a bit difficult for me to pull out a Christian theme, but y’all made it look easy once again. I have been making a conscious effort to see classic films and love the idea of more episodes on them in the future. For fans of the Dark Knight Trilogy, I recommend a German film called The Testament of Dr. Mabuse, directed by Fritz Lang. I have heard that Dr. Mabuse influenced Chris Nolan in writing the Dark Knight, particularly the Joker’s character. Here’s a link to Nolan’s Top 10 Criterion Collection films, where this is #4. http://bit.ly/2edSNeK It’s on Hulu until they stop streaming the Criterion Collection in November.

    On to The Invisible Man, which impressed me most with it’s special effects. If you thought Flora’s character was a bit flat, be glad they didn’t include her twin sister Fauna *rimshot*. Your theme of trying to correct a fellow Christian was pretty genius, that hadn’t occurred to me at all. What I notice is that as Jack Griffin was invisible and seemed to grow in power and ability to sin and get away with it, his accountability and consequences before God grew in proportion. He could steal, murder, assault, and wreak all sorts of havoc, but he paid for it with isolation and madness, even when other humans couldn’t catch and stop him. Which leads me to Hebrews 4:13 “And no creature is hidden from God, but everything is naked and exposed to the eyes of him to whom we must render an account.” (NET) Like Jack Griffin, there may be times when we find ourselves able to sin and escape consequences from our fellow man, but God sees all and knows all, and we are ultimately accountable to Him.

    And if you’re going to determine the greatest novelist ever, I have to submit Charles Dickens. My money goes on Chuck D in a Steel Cage Match with Tolstoy and Melville.

    Love the show guys! #muhweeladgimli

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