ANT-MAN: Good Intentions and Forgiveness | FCC 87

Scott Lang means well when he sets out to be reconciled to his daughter, but do his good intentions get in the way of accomplishing that goal? Is it even possible for Lang, a convicted felon, to be reconciled to society when he can’t even be forgiven by Baskin-Robbins? Join us as we discuss these and other Christian themes in Marvel’s Ant-Man.

For your convenience you will find each podcast segment at the time referenced below:

  • 00:00:00 – Introduction
  • 00:02:26 – Movie Discussion
  • 00:29:53 – Christian Themes in ANT-MAN
  • 01:13:09 – Listener Challenge and Feedback
  • 01:19:30 – Reel News – R.I.P. David Bowie and Alan Rickman
  • 01:31:24 – Well-mannered Frivolity
  • 01:41:24 – Lightning Round 
  • 01:43:08 – Upcoming

Good Intentions Getting In the Way

Scott Lang loves his daughter Cassie, and he wants to get her back. After a brief vocal bout with his ex-wife’s new fiancé, Scott tries to win over Cassie’s mother Maggie; he admits that he has messed up and pleads his case for forgiveness. He then asks what it is that he can do to be able to see Cassie legally again, and Maggie gives him three simple steps: “get an apartment, get a job, and pay child support.” And if Scott had followed these three simple instructions – which could’ve been done without breaking the law – he would have been able to see his daughter again.

Dr. Hank Pym, however, offers a more expedient way that unfortunately involves Scott breaking the law again, thus making him risk seeing Cassie ever again. In fact, in the world of the story, if Hank and Scott hadn’t succeeded in their plans, both of them and their families would have been killed. Thankfully, Ant-Man saves the day by going subatomic – a state of being regarded as suicidal – and disarming the Yellowjacket’s suit and making the latter implode; so in a way, the ends justify the means…right?

This image from ANT-MAN shows Scott Lang holding his daughter Cassie Lang at her birthday party.

This question isn’t necessarily meant for Christians who are speaking to non-Christians but rather for Christians who are getting ready to speak to those non-Christians and maybe even people who aren’t as mature in the faith as they are. It’s a reflection point: are my good intentions playing out in reality by my actions the way I intend for them to? In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus warns his listeners that not everyone “with good intentions” will enter the kingdom of Heaven, but only those who do the will of the Father – those three simple steps. Anything beyond that compromises the integrity of the outreach in the first place.


Baskin-Robbins Always Finds Out What God Has Already Forgiven

As mentioned before, Scott Lang is a convicted felon, and as “cool” as a crime it was, he still had to pay the price for that crime. He still owed a debt to society, which ended up being three years in San Quentin State Prison. Upon his release, his is picked up by his friend Luís, who quickly starts telling him about another “job” that he should be in on. But Scott shuts him down quickly because he doesn’t want to risk going back jail (at first; see previous segment). He wants to play it straight for as long as he can.

The only problem is that, even though he has served his time and has paid that debt to society, no one else will hire him. Even if he does have that Master’s Degree in electrical engineering, because of his crime, he can only obtain a job at Baskin-Robbins; even then, he is still fired when the manager finds out. And if he can’t get a job, he’ll have that much harder of a time seeing Cassie.

This image from ANT-MAN shows Paul Rudd as Scott Lang while he is working at Baskin-Robbins.

Society doesn’t seem to want to forgive Scott Lang for a crime that God already has forgiven. This is an indictment on the Church akin to that of the Ghost of Christmas Present in A Christmas Carol; where is the body of believers that will give him that second chance? He shouldn’t have to keep paying for a crime that’s he’s already paid for, and yet no other business can trust him because of his convicted status.

Thankfully, Dr. Hank Pym serves as his mediator between the world – with business that will not hire him – and his daughter Cassie. Dr. Pym can provide the peace between Scott and the rest of the world upon Scott’s taking up of Dr. Pym’s own will. In a sense, Dr. Pym is giving Scott that clean slate, much like the clean slate Jesus offers us in order to make peace with God.


Key Texts

  1. Matthew 7:21-23 NLT

    Not everyone who calls out to me, ‘Lord! Lord!’ will enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Only those who actually do the will of my Father in heaven will enter.

  2. Hebrews 8:12 NLT

    And I will forgive their wickedness, and I will never again remember their sins.


Finding Christ In Cinema is the show where we discover Christian themes in movies past and present. Join us and together we’ll dig deeper into the silver-screen classics of yesteryear as well as the box-office hits of today. Brought to you by the Great Commission Transmission Network. View the complete show notes, including links to articles discussed, by clicking here.

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About Brenden Taylor

Brenden is an educational assistant and tutor by day and a theatre practitioner by night. He has his M.A. in Theatre Arts and is always looking for a way to use good stories to soften people’s hearts.

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  • Philip Heard

    God job guys, this was a really fun movie you covered. I was surprised by how much I liked it, it was a much smaller, more intimate film than we typically get from Marvel. If you were surprised that Michael Pena packs a punch, then you probably haven’t seen him in End of Watch with Jake Gyllenhaal. It’s a very good film, but filters need to be up for lots of language & violence. Also, Evangeline Lilly did a great job in this movie, and Lost is also a favorite show of mine, along with Fringe- which happened to have a villain named David Robert Jones- David Bowie’s given name. This is like 6 Degrees of FCC or something- or ADD? I dunno.
    Anyway, one thing I got from Ant-Man is the idea of second chances. When a celebrity or athlete does something the public condemns, you often hear about how forgiving Americans can be when someone just comes clean and apologizes. But how about God? He doesn’t just give second chances, but many more than that. Heck, I typically screw up multiple times before I even get to my lunch break, and I depend on God’s abundant mercy and forgiveness. So while Ant-Man is good at exemplifying a second chance, let’s remember God is so much more gracious than even that!
    And thanks to Brenden for recommending the N.T.Wright Podcast, it’s a great resource! #muhweeladgimli

  • Beautiful Media

    This was a great review of how we should watch Ant Man as Christians. We need to be careful of what we justify in the name of good intentions, and we should also be willing to forgive as God forgives. It is amazing how movies can bring these fundamental truths to life and help us understand them better.

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